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are. >> now look at the relationship between the united states and pakistan. we'll hear from a former u.s. ambassador to pakistan the ambassador to the united states and former adviser to hillary clinton. hosted by the world affairs council of america, this is 45 minutes. [applause] >> is a great pleasure to be here with such a great panel, three ambassadors and one globally renowned journalist and scholars. so i've been told there have been a lot of questions about pakistan and afghanistan so far and i think we have a first-rate panel to start dealing with them. what i'm going to do in terms of focusing the discussion is i'm going to key off with questions to each of our panelists, one each and allow for a little bit of follow up and then i will open the floor to use and you will have more time to engage with them. let me begin with ambassador munter. you already got his bio, but i think in some ways he is almost uniquely positioned to provide us a very recent perspective on what pakistan looks like in the united states to official american advisers and diplomats and also the u.s. pa
is a conversation about american relations with pakistan. it's with of the u.s. ambassador to pakistan and the afghan ambassador to the u.s.. also a former adviser to secretary of state clinton. this was part of the national security conference hosted by the world affairs council of america. it's 45 minutes. [applause] it's a great pleasure to be here with such a great panel. 3g ambassadors and one globally renowned journalist and scholars. so, i've been told that there have been a lot of questions about pakistan and afghanistan so far in your proceedings, and i think we have a first-rate panel to start dealing with them. what i'm going to do in terms of focusing that discussion is i am going to tee off with questions to each of the panelists. one to each and then i will allow for a little bit of fallout and then i will open the floor to you so you have a little more time to engage with them. but the end debate could begin with the ambassador munter her you already got his biography that is i think in some ways almost uniquely positioned to provide us a very recent perspective on what
pakistan. some reports saying it's hiding some of these militants that are involved in the upheaval that's going on within the afghanistan population. guest: yes, ever since 9/11 it's been widely appreciated that many of the afghanistan taliban leaders were forced out by the u.s. war into pakistan. for a period of time the expectation was that pakistan would do more against those fleeing taliban when it could. increasingly however the skepticism mounted and pakistan perceives some of those militants being had helpful to it. it maintains relationships with it in the network right on afghanistan's eastern border with pakistan. cease it as a militant group that pakistan has influence with, not necessarily full control over but relatively more friendly and doesn't want to pick a fight with in spite of the fact that the united states has placed pleasure on pakistan to do that over a period of years. so pakistan has provided a safe haven that allows them to continue in ways it wouldn't have had they taken a firmer line against these groups. >> jon is joining us from utah. good morning sir. cal
ambassadors discusses relations between the u.s. and pakistan. after that former middle east envoy dennis ross talks about iran, israel and u.s./middle east policy. and later, a look at the aftermath of the arab spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiative called teen cancer america. it aims to set up hospitals and medical centers in the strategic areas across the country. see their remarks live beginning at 1 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public atears. weak dies fee you are -- weekdays featuring live coverage of the senate and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedule at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> for
it end? when do we stop? when do we leave in haiti, pakistan. atlanta zero. finally important. she said that. second thing getting back directly to your question had to do with corruption. she talked about corruption as an obstacle development. she tied a line directly between corruption and poor countries and corruption in the united states inside the beltway contracts that are fed back. we can talk about a lot of other system and tie and outlined that we are part of the world. we are subject to the same kind of forces of incumbent economic interests capturing the political process, getting government contracts in effect now comes. to see somebody of her stature stapes hangs is more than an ibook. so what you're saying is true and is deeply important. >> host: philip auerswald, you read about the current telecommunications we are living through and trying to understand and manage. help us. >> host: first of all we have to understand the difference between them mobile phone and a rich country and a mobile phone in most of the world. so before the mobile phone, only two technologies to r
#% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federal level, and they trained 36,000 police. i think they need 150,000 or more than that. we have to go into judges, train the judges, the prosecutors. did you know that a prosecutor here in the united states, if
. there should be a timeline. when does it end? when do we stop? in haiti, pakistan, anywhere else in the world. timeline from zero. vitally important she said that. second thing she says directly back to your question had to do with corruption. she talked about corruption as an obstacle development, but she tied a line directly between corruption and poor countries and corruption in the united states inside the beltway contracts that are fed.correct she talked about through them. because through bottle in tie and were also part of the world. we're subject to the same kind of forces of incumbent economic interests capturing the political process, getting government contracts and affected the outcomes. we are also subject to that. to see some of the first archer is a lot more than an ibook. so what you're saying is true in the deeply import. >> philip auerswald, you write about the current telecommunications revolution that were a living while we try to understand it vantage. help us. >> okay, so first of all we have to understand the difference between a mobile phone and a rich country and a mo
-election of barack obama. those in afghanistan and pakistan may not have cheered his victory. obama will oversea the withdrawal of u.s. combat troops from afghanistan by the end of 2014. that's a number of challenges in the region. >> reporter: afghanistan and pakistan are affected by the fights. about 100,000 american troops were stationed in afghanistan. the number has fallen toess than 7000 d furtr reductions are planned. others worry the withdrawal could plunge the country back into unstable world. dialogue between the united states and taliban were suspended earlier this year. during the election campaign obama distanced himself from the issue to avoid being branded weak on terrorism. with the election behind him the president may become more flexible. here in pakistan relations with washington are expected to remain tense. the two sides differ over how to handle elements of al qaeda and other militants hiding in remote areas of pakistan near the afghanistan border. the obama administration has said they're not doing enough to comfort terrorists operationing on pakistani soil. the u.s. have
. as pakistan's schoolgirl recovers from gunshot wounds, her father thanks the world for inspirational support. it's midday here in london, 8:00 p.m. in tokyo, and 6:30 p.m. in burma, a state undergoing rapid political change, but still dogged by ethnic violence. the bbc has gained access to villages in rakhine state, destroyed by violence in recent weeks. it's a region torn in two by ethnic conflict between buddhists and minority muslim rakhinjas. but the violence appears to go beyond local communal clashes. evidence has emerged that the burmese security forces are complicit in violence. we have this report from rakhine state. >> across the great waterways on burma's westernmost coast, a wave of hatred is breaking communities apart. there are very few roads here. this is how we reach a remote fishing village of 1,500. there are 5,000 evacuees. their homes have been destroyed by the sectarian attacks which began in june. local buddhists are trying to drive out muslims who they say don't belong in burma. these muslim men showed us scars from the assault on their village two weeks ago, an assaul
programs aimed at raising federal revenues. >>> pakistan remains one of the biggest foreign policy headaches for re-elected president obama. his second term will oversee the withdrawal of u.s. combat troops from afghanistan, scheduled to be complete by the end of 2014. nhk world's hideki yui outlines the challenges those two countries pose for obama's next term. >> reporter: afghanistan and pakistan are two nations affected by the u.s. fight against terrorism. both expect the obama administration to shift its focus during a second term to rebuilding the economy back home. at the height of the u.s. deployment, about 100,000 american troops were stationed in afghanistan. the number has fallen to less than 70,000, and further reductions are planned. many in afghanistan welcome that trend, but others voice concern that it could throw the unstable country back into civil war. dialogue between the united states and the taliban was suspended earlier this year. during the election campaign, obama distanced himself from the issue to avoid being branded weak on terrorism. with the election b
for education by girls in pakistan has received global attention since the shooting of malala yousafzai last month. islamic extremists shot the 15-year-old education campaigner, a move that caused outrage among the international community. the incident has exposed the dangers faced by girls in pakistan who want an education. nhk world's cameron masrur reports from islamabad. >> reporter: this junior high school for girls was blown up on november 27th. it was one of many schools in northwest pakistan attacked by militants. the attacks have continued even after last month's shooting of malala yousafzai promised wide criticism. they are thought to be the work of the pakistani taliban. this girl is a student at the school. >> translator: all the classrooms were destroyed. there is nothing left. >> reporter: for now, she stu studies at home, but she wants to go back to school as quickly as possible. no matter the danger. >> translator: islam allows women's education. why did our school get destroyed? education is our right. >> reporter: an angry message thought to be from a student is written on
from around the world have learned about the struggles in pakistan to do something girls in most places take for granted. islamic extremists shot the 15-year-old last month. now people everywhere are finding out what pakistani girls who want to learn have to go through. >> reporter: the junior high school for 380 girls was blown up on october 27th. it's just one of many schools in north western pakistan attacked by militants. the attacks have continued even after last month's shooting. they are taught to be the work of the pakistani taliban. >> translator: all the classrooms are destroyed. there is nothing left. >> reporter: for now my studies at home but she wants to go back to school as quickly as possible no matter the danger. >> translator: islam allows women right to education. why did our school have to be destroyed? education is our right. >> reporter: an angry message taught my student is written on a blackboard inside this school. >> translator: heaven punished those who destroy our school. we await allah's revenge. >> reporter: extremists in pakistan have ataked 700 schools in
in afghanistan and pakistan and that's where the leadership of al qaeda after 9/11 found refuge. our military forces, our intelligence professionals, our diplomats, our development experts, have taken the fight to al qaeda's leadership, first through dramatically expanded counter terrorism operations on the afghanistan-pakistan border, and second, through a renewed, revitalized and properly resourced effort to help build an afghanistan that can secure and govern itself and that's the fundamental mission in afghanistan, is to ensure that that country can govern and secure itself so it will never again become a safe haven for al qaeda. over the last few years, al qaeda's leaderships, their ranks have been decimated, and includes the loss of four of al qaeda's five top leaders in the last two and a half years alone -- osama bin laden, sheik saed al-masri, abdul alrahman and abdullah al-libi. through what has probably been the most precise campaign in the history of warfare and by partnering with local allies, numerous other experienced operational terrorists and commanders in this region have be
to remain on the region during the obama's second term. jun kobayashi, nhk world, bangkok. >>> pakistan is showcasing state-of-the-art weapons and military equipment at a technology fair as it steps up its anti-terrorism efforts. pakistan is a major world importer of arms, and china is eager to boost sales in the country. pakistani government is hosting the fair in kara shi chi where 130 military-related companies from 21 countries gathering to show off their wares. china is a key weapons provider for pakistan and is operating a pavilion at the fair to promote its businesses. a company official attending event says china can provide all the equipment the pakistani military needs to conduct counterterrorism operations. pakistan is collaborating with china to develop military equipment. the code developed jf-17 fighter plane is also on display at the exhibition. >> modern fighter airplanes which are available in other airplanes as well but very high coast. this is very economical, uses the right economic power, and also easy to maintain. >> the fair is also a forum for pakistan to promote
world, bangkok. >>> pakistan is showcasing state-of-the-art weapons and military equipment at a technology fair as it steps up its anti-terrorism efforts. pakistan is a major world importer of arms, and china is eager to boost sales in the country. pakistani government is hosting the fair in karachi where 130 military-related companies from 21 countries gathering to show off their wares. china is a key weapons provider for pakistan and is operating a pavilion at the fair to promote its businesses. a company official attending event says china can provide all the equipment the pakistani military needs to conduct counterterrorism operations. pakistan is collaborating with china to develop military equipment. the code developed jf-17 fighter plane is also on display at the exhibition. >> have all capabilities of a modern fighter airplanes which are available in other airplanes, as well, but very high cost. this is very economical, uses the right economic power, and also easy to maintain. >> the fair is also a forum for pakistan to promote its own weapons such as tanks, missile
. >>> an envoy from afghanistan has visited pakistan to try and make progress towards peace talks with the taliban. the envoy was expected to ask pakistan to use its influence to encourage the taliban to start a dialogue. progress seemed increasingly urgent for the afghan government before international forces and combat missions in 2014. nhk world's hideki yui reports. >> reporter: afghan envoy van ra banni arrived on monday. he was expected to ask afghanistan to broker talks between the afghan government and the taliban. >> translator: we will be talking to them about how to carry the reconciliation process forward and also about how pakistan can help in bringing peace and stability to afghanistan. this is an extremely important visit. >> reporter: the taliban has shown a positive attitude to talks with the united states, but it has so far ignored the afghan's proposals for a peace deal. the insurgent group considers the karzai government a puppet of the u.s. before the u.s.-led invasion of afghanistan in 2001, pakistan was a supporter of the former taliban regime. afghanistan b
will be made by this month's registration deadline. >>> an enjoy from afghanistan asked pakistan for help in establishing peace talks with the taliban. he was expected to ask pakistani officials to use their influence to start a dialog. they're working against a deadline, the international forces and their combat missions in two years. >> afghan enjoy heads the country's council for peace talks with the taliban. he arrived in islam bad on monday. he was expected to ask pakistan to broker talks between the afghan government and the taliban. >> translator: we will be talking to them about how to carry the reconciliation process forward a als about how pakistan can help in bringing peace and stability to afghanistan. this is an extremely important visit. >> the taliban has a positive attitude to talks with the united states, but it has so far ignored the after began government's proposals for a peace deal. the insurgent group views the government as a puppet of the u.s. before the u.s. led invasion of afghanistan in 2001, pakistan was a supporter of the former taliban regime. afghanistan bel
it was worse during the past four years. host: let's go to a map of the region. you brought up pakistan. some reports saying it's hiding some of these militants that are involved in the upheaval that's going on within the afghanistan population. guest: yes, ever since 9/11 it's been widely appreciated that many of the afghanistan taliban leaders were forced out by the u.s. war into pakistan. for a period of time the expectation was that pakistan would do more against those fleing taliban when it could. increasingly however the skepticism mounted and pakistan per seeves some of those militants being had helpful to it. it maintains relationships with it in the network right on afghanistan's eastern border with pakistan. cease it as a militant group that pakistan has influence with, not necessarily full control over but relatively more friendly and doesn't want to pick a fight with in spite of the fact that the united states has placed pleasure on pakistan to do that over a period of years. so pakistan has provided a safe thaven allows them to continue in ways it wouldn't have had they taken a f
of the 21st century. those of you who are familiar with more fighting back since with pakistan, iraq and afghanistan know how important this has become but though one raid did iraq where operator seized the computer equivalent of the rolodex negative a rolodex that tracked 500 al qaeda suicide bombers or terrace filtered into iraq through syria. but the database of 500 individuals that were recruited to blow themselves up was critical with the effort to take al qaeda at it is in mesopotamia apart inside iraq. >> the mother lode of documents seized that has been known as the sinjar parade illustrates the point* nicely made by lt. general lewis, or flynn six years after a 9/11 attacks that intelligence committees representing a wide variety of agencies, but notorious and secret, had been collaborating on the unprecedented capability to crush the terrorist networks. addition to the special ops they used supercomputers and custom software for deployed a skilled and list and to charge just about every type of intel into searchable data weather tips or documents from the old fashioned spy
plan to the president he argued if the seal team had tripped pakistan's defenses tripped their alarms, and his men found themselves surrounded by pakistan's armed forces and air force that he advised that they strong arm the compound and wait for washington to negotiate their extraction. it was president obama who said no, if you're going in, i want you to go in with enough force to fight your way out of the% country if necessary. clearly that was embracing of a large risk. that was embracing the possibility of actually getting in a shooting war with pakistan. so it did surprise me that it would be the president who would demand they go in in force as opposed to the military commander. >> eliot: that is fascinating because one presumes had there been a stand off that could have been negotiated out. fascinating and i'm sure there will be more, and maybe you'll write more about that as time goes on. mark bowden, author of the spectacular new book" the finish" the killing of osama bin laden. thank you for your time tonight. >> thank you eliot. >> eliot: the decision with the potential to
, with respect to core al qaeda in afghanistan and pakistan, and that's where the leadership of al qaeda after 9/11 found refuge. our military forces, our intelligence professionals, our diplomats, our development experts have taken the fight to al qaeda's leadership. first through dramatically expanded counterterrorism operations on the afghanistan- pakistan border. and second, through a renewed, revitalized and properly resourced effort to help build an afghanistan that can secure and govern itself. and that's the fundamental mission in afghanistan is to ensure that that country can govern and secure itself so it will never again become a safe haven for al qaeda. over the last few years, al qaeda's leadership, their ranks, have been decimated and includes the loss of four of al qaeda's five top leaders in the last 2 1/2 years alone. osama bin laden, sheik al masri and others in what has been the precise campaign in the history of warfare and numerous operational priorities and commanders in this region have been killed or captured. this pressure has significantly demoralized and weakened al qa
be among the top runners. tens of thousands have come out in support of the pakistan a teenager shot in the head last month, targeted because she was campaigning for the ride of girls to get an education. she is recovering at a hospital in england. >> just one month after leaving her for dead, she is sitting out and reading get well cards. from her hospital room, and her father sent her thanks to supporters worldwide. >> she is recovering well and wants me to tell you she has been inspired and humbled by the thousands of cards, messages, and gifts that she has received. it has helped my daughter stays strong. >> others are drawing strength. in this school, the un special envoy for education got a lesson. >> she was very brave and had to stand up to people intimidating her. >> we fight for her rights even though there was lots of danger. it was brave, she gave us an example. >> of the girls have big dreams, and when they grow up, many want to be just like her. dr. gordon brown is hearing about the ambitions people have, many girls never see the inside of the classroom. she risked her
turmoil, including a military coup. >>> pakistan says it's ready to free a number of taliban prisoners in its custody. pakistan supported the ousted taliban regime in afghanistan and is believed to retain some influence over the militant group. the afghan government has requested their release as it tries to engage the taliban in peace negotiations. from islamabad, nhk world, islam reports. >> reporter: an envoy visited islamabad this week for talks with pakistani political and military leaders. he is the chair of the high peace continue sewell and leads efforts to open negotiations with the taliban. on wednesday evening, pakistan announced it was ready to release a number of taliban prisoners. local media say at least seven people could be freed. islamabad is under pressure not only from afghanistan but also the united states to help stabilize afghanistan. doing so is increasingly urgent, with the approaching withdrawal of foreign combat troops by the end of 2014. in afghanistan, the announcement was met with a mixture of hope and skepticism. >> pakistan rule in strengthening the peac
competing globally. the middle east, china, afghanistan, pakistan and u.s. energy policy as the six top issues. starting with that. looking at its strategically, do you feel that those are the core issues before president obama and this administration and our country going into 2013? if not, what would you change? what would you add? >> when i was informed by lori murray about the outcome of the process by which the world affairs council went through and came up with those six issues, i thought you had it exactly right. i think those are the big issues and congratulations to you. i think you had them just right. i think there's an overarching issue on top of all of them in some sense enables all of them. and that is if you look at the national security challenges and foreign policy challenges we face, i say the number one challenge is getting our fiscal house in order. getting a handle on the debt. getting a handle on the deficit which are critical in order to get the economy growing again and people back to work. and think that is over -- it's certainly number one domestic challenge. m
in afghanistan, and the difficulty with pakistan where are we with al-qaeda? >> well, on the good news side of things the main al-qaeda leadership that were there on the original 9/11 most of those have been killed or captured but over the last decade al-qaeda has generated franchises in places like north africa who's member were involved in on attack on the american embassy in benghazi and sending fighters into syria, and in yemen those that were responsible for the so-called underpanteds bomber. so these different franchises while maybe not having think ability to carry out mass attacks like the 9/11 attack still can cause great violence. >> jennifer: really appreciate you coming in. thank you so much eric schmidt. >> thank you. >> jennifer: appreciate it. up next the saying it all depends on your point of view is especially relevant when discussing drones. there is a human dynamic that goes well beyond the strategy and statistics and we'll tell you about that right after the break. (vo)answer: pour disaronno into a flute glass and top with prosecco. brought to you
pakistan hedges its bets based on what they believe our long-term commitment to the region would be. their calculus would be changed knowing that we will be there beyond 2014 to secure our national objectives. >> right. what other capitals did you have in mind? >> the other capitals i had in mind first and foremost were the 49 capitals of the coalition. i also think the other capitals have that interest, iran, the stans, russia, china, all the countries that have interest in afghanistan. their calculus would be affected by our signing a bilateral agreement. >> so i think it is a very important answer. i have the same feeling. i think islamabad is the first capital that would be affected by the bilateral agreement. tying some elements of the pakistani government to terrorist groups. they are hedging their bets for what happens the day after we leave. if we're not leaving presumably, they lose that argument. but, you know, there is -- every situation is different. i can't help but relate this to iraq. nobody wanted our discussions with the iraqi government for a presence in iraq after
picture. fellow students in pakistan honoring malala. it's not only one, we are all malala. the whole of pakistan is malala. >> my message to the female students of this country is that all of the female students should get education because education is so important. >> reporter: across the border in india, prayers for malala's recovery. in england where she's being treated supporters lit candles in her name. >> we can vote for her to win the nobel peace prize to make her cause even greater. >> reporter: a cause picked up in the months after she was shot in the head for publically campaigning for education rights. on a visit to pakistan u.n. education envoy gordon brown presented a petition with a million signatures calling for education for all. malala, he said, has become a beacon of hope. >> people who were previously silent and said nothing are now saying we cannot allow this to happen. we are going to change this. >> reporter: doctors are preparing for her next surgery, but they say she continues to make remarkable recovery. this week her hospital in birmingham released a new vi
on tuesday. opium used in afghanistan is smuggled into pakistan and several asian nations. the united nations office on drugs and crime says 5,800 tons of opium was made from poppies in afghanistan last year. that's an increase of 60% from the year before. opium is a major source of funding for taliban militants. it held a ceremonial burning of confiscated drugs to highlight its campaign against the public trade. but opium is a -- crime organizations in pakistan and other countries. pakistani interior minister called on western nations to share responsibility for the drug trade, although most opium consumed in asia is produced in the west. >> i demanded the west to -- the blame is on pakistan, all afghanistan, all the countries here. >> reporter: those who produce opium and transport it and those who consume it need to work together to end this scourge. >> and that will wrap up our bulletin for today. >>> japanese nuclear experts are trying to figure out if the nation's only operating nuclear plant is vulnerable to earthquakes. the oe plant's operator conducted a survey on a fault beneath the
into pakistan and central asian nations such as tajikstan and uzbekistan. the united nations office on drugs and crime says 5,800 tons of opium was made from poppies in afghanistan last year. there's an increase of 60% from the year before. the afghan government says opium is a major source of funding for taliban militants. it held a ceremonial burning of accelerated drugs to highlight its campaign against the poppy trade. but opium is a regional problem. afghan-made drugs fund islamic extremists and crime organizations in pakistan and other countries. pakistani interior minister called on western nations to share responsibility for the drug trade. even though most opium is produced in asia, it's consumed in the west. >> i demand the west to reduce their demand. where the blame is on pakistan, the blame is on afghanistan, the blame is on the regional countries here. >> reporter: opium from afghanistan is applied to the whole region. those who produce it and transport it and those who consume it need to work together to end this scourge. nhk world, islamabad. >>> emerging economic powers stil
's prime -- foreign minister said that pakistan objected to the decision we attempted to communicate with the pakistan -- a objected to the decision. >> we attempted to communicate with the pakistan foreign office. and since those comments were not received by the foreign office, by fax we communicated with them. >> outside, people have been celebrating an enchanting -- and chanting. execution, while legally in india, is rare. the last one was eight years ago. this man carried out one of the deadliest attack this country has seen. >> his body has been buried in the premises of this jail. the timing is significant, because it comes just days before the fourth anniversary of the november, 2008 deaths. >> last year, lasala or had the second-highest murder rate in the world. -- el salvador had the second highest murder rate in the world. earlier this year, a truce was broken between the two criminal street gang groups prepar. that has caused the murder rate to drop significantly. linda presba has the report. >> these men all belong to the 18th street gang. they are one side in a vicious
in pakistan have staged another attack against women seeking an education. the targets this time were college students. the attack occurred on a van that was carrying 20 students. they were returning home from their university in northwest pakistan. the attackers used guns and hurled what appeared to be acid at the students. two men were burned and shot. nhk interviewed one of the victims after agreeing not to reveal her identity. >> translator: an armed group attacked our van. my brother and i were burned. they targeted us because they are againsted girls like me getting an education. >> the incident came just days after taliban gunman shot a 15-year-old schoolgirl. she was campaigning for women's education in pakistan. she's recovering from her injuries in britain. >>> the leaders of vietnam and russia have agreed to talk sea trade talks next year. russian prime minister and his counterpart announced the plan on wednesday in hanoi. economic and trade cooperation between the two countries has been steadily rising. medved said he hopes to get an increase in bilateral trade, that would bring t
pakistan to meet with pakistan's suf czarry. he is united nations special envoy of global education issues. he'll deliver a petition with over 1 million signatures urging pakistan to make education available to all its children. >>> it was warm and sunny today in tokyo, snow in our neighbor china, though. rachel ferguson has more with weather. rachel? >> certainly we are going to be see snow spreading across northeastern asia over the next couple days. a low here moving across into the beijing area and heading towards the northeast. north korea is going to be getting some of that snowfall. down towards the south, it is a rain event. that coming up through southern china in towards the east, through shanghai and from saturday evening, we're going to be seeing it coming into japan. pleasant day across much of japan on saturday as a low pulls away at the moment. however, we will see that rain coming in from the south and sunday is going to be a little unstable with showers and thunderstorms scattered throughout the country. temperaturewise not too bad, 18 on saturday. in tokyo, while we have
. that helped my daughter's survival and stay strong. her voice is the voice of the people of pakistan and all down trodden and deprived children. if today her voice goes unheard, then coming generations will go without basic human rights and sublime values. >> joining me now is the man who created a now famous 2009 documentary about malala. adam v.malek. adam, there is a movement for malala to receive the next nobel peace prize. 100,000 people have signed a petition at change.org calling for that. what would -- and the deadline for the nominations are february 1st. what -- what would it mean for malala's cause around the world. and what would it mean in pakistan where you spend so much time working for her to be nominated for the peace prize and possibly winning it? >> i mean, the -- one of the most amazing things that's come out of this story is just the -- the amount of attention that malala has received worldwide, but in pakistan, the change we've seen is remarkable. this is a country that has a severe female education priccri and a pretty silent problem for a long time. and since the shoo
their weapons. now they are reaching out to pakistan for help to start peace talks. the government's chief envoy to the taliban met pakistani foreign minister. he said negotiations are necessary for ensuring stability in afghanistan. he reportedly asked pakistan officials to act as mediators. the insurgents have indicated a willingness to discuss a peace deal with u.s. officials. former pakistani intelligence chief says pakistani authorities are well placed to support peace talks. he cites their close relationship with the taliban. >>> china gave the media a glimpse of its military aircraft. it showed off some unmanned aircraft and a stealth fighter. the air show will open on tuesday. it will be the country's largest. drones develop by a state own company are on display for the first time. the nine meter aircraft was covered by a cloth. the front tip is round and there appears to be missiles beneath its wing. other models are on display. government plans to use drones for surveillance in the east china and south china seas. china succeeded in a test flight in october. >>> tuna draws customers ba
, and that's what we are trying to do in afghanistan and pakistan. i think it's one of the most remarkable stories of our time. clearly, we've gotten good at this. what are the implications of it? one of the things it means is that a lot of the action, if you will, in a war against terrorist organizations, does not take place in afghanistan or pakistan. it takes place, as dull as it seems, in washington, d.c.. it takes place in cia headquarters, the pentagon, and at the white house. you know, it's funny for me to write a story about a military operation where 90% of the story takes place in washington, d.c., but that's where the story actually unfolded. today, unique, i think, among presidents of the united states, president obama is almost, daily, given a dossier on a target. this is someone in the cross hairs of the cia or the military, and obama or directer petraeus has to make a decision about whether to shoot at that target, whether to take that person out. now, i know that presidents have had to make critically important decisions affecting thousands and hundreds of thousands of live
of this one. >>> a young woman is assaulted in pakistan which leads to something that they call honor killing. now a film exposes the terror behind the victim's search for justice. >>> watch out because here comes honey booboo child. see the star as a real piece of art. >>> plus the monday buzzword for your shot at a free ipad and how that sky dive from space inspired one man -- >> to try his own red bull styled stunt. >> too bad this guy takes it right into old astronaut. >>> it's halloween weekend october 27 near baltimore, maryland. keep an eye on the guy on the dirt bike. know who he is dressed like? he has an evil kanevil costume on. a couple of buddies have a ramp on the back of a four wheeler. that ramp is right in front of a fountain right across the street from the sheriffs department. >> which is next to a lot of brick skbauwalls and buildings. >> he goes backwards against traffic and moves around again.q he did it! >> he channelled his fears and launched himself right over the fountain. the crowd goes crazy but the pleeps don't despite the crowd that gathered around they didn't kno
who accompanied mortenson and spoke to them in pakistan's remote hushe valley. they also told us that mortenson didn't stumble into korphe lost and alone and that he didn't go to korphe at all until nearly a year later on another visit. >> he did build a school in korphe. >> he did, and it's a good thing. but if you go back and read the first few chapters of that book, you realize, "i'm being taken for a ride here." >> one of the most compelling experiences i had was in july of '96. >> it's not a solitary example. upon close examination, some of the most touching and harrowing tales in mortenson's books appear to have been either greatly exaggerated or made up out of whole cloth. >> i went to the area to find a place to build a school, and what happened is, i got kidnapped by the taliban for eight days. >> the kidnapping story was featured in three cups of tea and referred to in his follow-up best seller, stones into schools, with this 1996 photograph of his alleged captors. we managed to locate four men who were there when the photo was taken. two of them actually appear in the
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